The Rapid Elearning Blog

Archive for July, 2016


free templates from community

As you know, the Articulate community regularly shares all sorts of free downloads. We have elearning templates, free PowerPoint templates, graphics, and all other sorts of free assets that can be used for your elearning courses. Also, you are free to use them for your projects without attribution.

On top of that, many of your peers in the industry and elearning community regularly share free downloads. For today’s post I’d like to feature a few of them. Take advantage of what they offer and be sure to let them know you appreciate the files.

Joanna Kurpiewska

free templates JK

Alexander Salas

free templates AS

Linda Lorenzetti

free templates LL

Jackie Van Nice

free templates JVN

Montse Posner Anderson

free templates MPA

Matt Guyan

MG

Veronica Budnikas

free templates VB

Dianne Hope

free templates DH

Tracy Carroll

free templates TC

Jeff Kortenbosch

free templates JK

Punab Parab

free templates PP

Ashley Chiasson

free templates AC

Mike Taylor

free templates MT

Nancy Woinoski

free templates NW

Paul Alders

free templates PA

John Toh

free templates JT

Meaghan Lister

free templates ML

I’m sure there are more in the community who have freely shared their resources. If you share free elearning templates in the community, feel free to add a link in the comments. The only stipulations are that they’re original content, not spam, free to use for commercial work, and don’t require an account or some sort of login to access the free resources.

Upcoming E-Learning Events

  • October 6: Amsterdam. 10 Production Tips from the E-Learning Challenges by David Anderson. Register here.
  • October 21: Sydney. 3-Hour Articulate Virtual Event: 10 Production Tips from the E-Learning Challenges, Creating Engaging Software Training in Rise 360, and more. Register here.
  • October 29: ATD Nashville. Here's Why You Need an E-Learning Portfolio.

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for e-learning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly e-learning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool e-learning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This e-learning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

 




learning interactions

Creating great interactive learning experiences requires a few core building blocks: relevant content, pull versus push, and real-world decisions. With those building blocks you’re able to structure effective learning scenarios that are meaningful to the learner and helps meet the objectives of the course.

One of those building blocks in creating relevant content or content that is placed in a meaningful context. Essentially, you want to recreate the types of scenarios that are similar to the ones the learner has in real life. This allows them to see the content in a meaningful context.

Learning Interactions: What is the Learner’s Real World Like?

Most courses have the right content, but that’s all it is–content. And the content is usually plastered over a series of bullet point screens. To make a great learning experience you need content in the right context. It needs to be relevant to the learner’s needs and world. They need to see how the content fits into their world, the interactions they have, and the decisions they need to make.

  • How is the course content used in the work environment of the user?
  • Why would they use it? And when they use it what happens?
  • Or if they don’t use it, what happens?

Learning Interactions: What Type of Environment Needs to be Built?

We make decisions all the time and they always produce some sort of consequence. These decisions happen in a real world and usually while interacting with other people like peers, managers, or customers.

When building relevant content that’s placed in the right context it’s important to understand the world of the learner.

  • Where are they located?
  • Do they need to use any equipment or machines?
  • And who are they interacting with? Peers, management, customers?

Learning Interactions: What Triggers the Need for Action?

When I build interactions in Storyline I always talk through the triggers. I ask, “What do I want to do and when do want to do it?”

In the same sense, when you build relevant scenarios for your courses where the learner has to make decisions, it’s important to know what the triggers are for those decisions.

  • What do they have to do and when do they have to do it?
  • And at what point are they going to need the course content to make the appropriate decision or take the right action?

Learning Interactions: How to Collect the Right Content?

A great way to get this information is to meet with those people who will take your courses. Ask them to give you scenarios where the course content is important or when they would need to know it to make good decisions.

  • Ask them what’s it like when things are going well? And then what it’s like when it not going so well. And what makes it go not some well? What types of things derail the day?
  • If they interact with equipment, what do they need to know? Where do they go to troubleshoot? What types of cheat sheets or job aids do they reference?
  • If they interact with people, what makes for good interactions? And what causes them to go sideways? How do they fix it?

The key in all of this is that instead of dumping a bunch of new content on your learners, find a way to put the content into a meaningful context–one that makes sense to their real world interactions. And when you do that you’ll be able to create great learning experiences.

Upcoming E-Learning Events

  • October 6: Amsterdam. 10 Production Tips from the E-Learning Challenges by David Anderson. Register here.
  • October 21: Sydney. 3-Hour Articulate Virtual Event: 10 Production Tips from the E-Learning Challenges, Creating Engaging Software Training in Rise 360, and more. Register here.
  • October 29: ATD Nashville. Here's Why You Need an E-Learning Portfolio.

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for e-learning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly e-learning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool e-learning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This e-learning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

 




drag and drop interactions

After last week’s post on the different drag & drop interaction examples, I had quite a few emails asking for tips on how to create drag and drop interactions for elearning. So now’s a good time to review some good general tips for building drag and drop interactions.

Why Are You Dragging?

There are a few reasons why we make onscreen objects draggable.

Drag and Drop Interactions Tips

  • Where is the user supposed to drag and drop the object? In most cases, drag and drop interactions require a drop target. Drop targets can be an actual object, or it may be an invisible element (like a hotspot) that controls where the dropped objects lands.
  • Do you want the object to snap to the drop target? There are different ways to work with the drop target. Sometimes, things may not be quite as evident onscreen, snapping to the target helps when the user gets the object over the target.

drag and drop interactions snap to target

  • Do you want to make the target visible? This makes sense if there are a number of drag and drop options and you have a very clear target for each draggable object.

drag and drop interactions ghost image

  • What happens when the user drags an object out of position? I like to add a ghost image or something to show where the drag object originally came from. It’s also an easy way to indicate progress.

drag and drop interactions ghost image

  • Are the instructions clear? Sometimes developers forget to put instructions for the interaction and what the user is to do. If you expect them to interact with the screen in a new way, you should include clear instructions. I like to use gate screens that stop the user and provides instructions.

Drag and Drop Interactions: Providing Feedback for Correct and Incorrect Actions

There are a few way to provide feedback when the user drops the object on a target.

  • The easiest way is to allow the target to accept the object. Using a snap feature essentially pulls the dragged item to the target. That lets the user know that they’ve dropped the object on a target. And depending on how you structure the drag and drop interactions, it can also be the means to show feedback for a correct action.
  • Another way to provide feedback to the user is to reject incorrect choices and cause the dropped object to return to the starting position.

drag and drop interactions bounce feedback

  • You can also provide immediate correct and incorrect feedback by changing the state of the object to reflect when it’s a right or wrong decision.

drag and drop interactions provide feedback

Here are some previous posts that cover drag and drop interactions in a bit more detail:

Drag and drop interactions can help make course more engaging and interactive. Too often we limit ourselves to standard click-based interactions and decision-making. Next time, try to convert one of those to a drag and drop and see how it goes. What tips do you have for those creating drag and drop interactions? Share them in the comments section.

Upcoming E-Learning Events

  • October 6: Amsterdam. 10 Production Tips from the E-Learning Challenges by David Anderson. Register here.
  • October 21: Sydney. 3-Hour Articulate Virtual Event: 10 Production Tips from the E-Learning Challenges, Creating Engaging Software Training in Rise 360, and more. Register here.
  • October 29: ATD Nashville. Here's Why You Need an E-Learning Portfolio.

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for e-learning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly e-learning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool e-learning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This e-learning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

 




drag an drop example

It helps to look at what others are doing to get ideas and inspiration for your own work. Sometimes looking at what others have done also gives us confidence that we can do something similar.

Drag and Drop Examples

drag and drop examples

This week I’d like to feature a number of drag and drop interactions that people in the community have created over the past couple of years.

On a side note, there were a lot of interactions that I couldn’t share because it was either a broken link because the file was moved or the interaction was hosted on Google Drive. Google Drive links are not going to work in about a month. You can fix that here.

Drag and Drop Examples from Weekly Challenges

drag and drop challenges

Here are two challenges that featured some drag and drop interactions. You’ll need to go to the following week to see the recap.

There’s a pretty diverse selection of interactions. Many of the interactions submitted in the weekly challenges also come with the source file for you to review and deconstruct.

If you have an example of a drag and drop that you’ve created using Storyline feel free to share it via the comments link.

Upcoming E-Learning Events

  • October 6: Amsterdam. 10 Production Tips from the E-Learning Challenges by David Anderson. Register here.
  • October 21: Sydney. 3-Hour Articulate Virtual Event: 10 Production Tips from the E-Learning Challenges, Creating Engaging Software Training in Rise 360, and more. Register here.
  • October 29: ATD Nashville. Here's Why You Need an E-Learning Portfolio.

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for e-learning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly e-learning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool e-learning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This e-learning 101 series and the free e-books will help.